Monthly Archives: April 2012

Arizona’s ‘Salt of the Earth’ Moment – New America Media

Arizona's 'Salt of the Earth' MomentNewAmerica Media, Commentary, Roberto Dr. Cintli Rodriguez, Posted: Apr 27, 2012

Editor’s Note: While the U.S. Supreme Court this week heard arguments over Arizona’s immigration law SB 1070, the fallout of another controversial law – the state’s ban on ethnic studies – is being felt across classrooms and communities in Tucson. If the matter is not resolved, the ethnic studies ban could be the next Arizona law to make it to the Supreme Court, writes commentator Roberto Dr. Cintli Rodriguez.

During the miners’ strike in Grants County, New Mexico in 1951, depicted in the 1954 epic film Salt of the Earth, the striking miners and their families were forced to endure extreme hardship as they struck the Empire Zinc Co. for some 15 months. In Tucson, Ariz., teachers from the recently dismantled Mexican American Studies (MAS) department are fast approaching a similar scenario. This, as the state and nation are seemingly a few inches closer to making racial profiling the unconstitutional law of the land.

via Arizona’s ‘Salt of the Earth’ Moment – New America Media.

Jeff Biggers: At Supreme Court, Arizona Leaves Affected Voices at Home: Q & A With Carlos Garcia, Puente Human Rights Advocate

While Gov. Jan Brewer unceremoniously dumped her disgraced SB 1070 partner Russell Pearce from Arizona’s front seats at tomorrow’s historic Supreme Court hearing on the state’s controversial immigration law, the seminal voices of those most affected by Arizona’s punitive measures will remain in the shadows — and unheard, even in the landslide of media and political forums sure to follow.

In effect, as legal experts battle over the ramifications of states’ rights and immigration jurisdiction, and political pundits range the arpeggio of opinions on racial profiling, criminalization of immigration without proper papers, and SB 1070′s “attrition by enforcement” approach that has struck a nerve with Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, the legions of undocumented laborers propping up Arizona’s fragile economic recovery in tourism, construction and agriculture have largely been cut out of the national discussion on the state’s landmark immigration showdown.

Are immigrants, in the words of Puente Arizona director Carlos Garcia, “political footballs that politicians on both sides kick around to score points for their own reelection”?

via Jeff Biggers: At Supreme Court, Arizona Leaves Affected Voices at Home: Q & A With Carlos Garcia, Puente Human Rights Advocate.

Tucson’s Ousted Mexican-American Studies Director Speaks: The Fight’s Not Over – COLORLINES

by Julianne Hing

 

Sean Arce may not have a job anymore, but he’s still going to defend the program he used to direct. Arce, the former director of Tucson Unified School District’s now-suspended Mexican American Studies program, was fired earlier this month in the latest crackdown on the program in what has become a years-long saga over the fate of the popular program.

via Tucson’s Ousted Mexican-American Studies Director Speaks: The Fight’s Not Over – COLORLINES.

M.E.Ch.A students march to promote education of Chicano students

The University’s chapter of M.E.Ch.A, the Chicano student union, held a political demonstration Wednesday to bring awareness to the importance of educating people on Chicano heritage.

Over 400 Latino students from across Oregon and from the University marched from McArthur Court to the EMU Amphitheater chanting and holding signs displaying education facts on Latino history. Students then took turns reading short excerpts on Chicano history and planted their fliers and posters in the lawn in front of the Collier House.

The demonstration was part of an annual conference that the University’s M.E.Ch.A. chapter hosts, which brings hundreds of young students from all over Oregon to the University for a day of workshops, guest speakers and even campus tours aimed at sparking interest in Latino communities to attend college. The theme to the conference this year was “Education: The Right to our History, the Right to Our Knowledge.”

via M.E.Ch.A students march to promote education of Chicano students.

[May 3, 2012] Napa Valley ethnic studies group to show film on Arizona school struggle – Vallejo Times Herald

NAPA — The Napa Valley Ethnic Studies Advocates, a newly formed group, will show the documentary “Precious Knowledge” on Thursday, May 3, at the Napa Valley College Performing Arts Center, 2277 Napa-Vallejo Highway.

The Performing Arts Center will be open 6 to 9 p.m. for the free event, and refreshments will be served during the meet and greet session.

The film documents the tension, passion and legal measures occurring as a result of Arizona’s ban on Tucson Unified School District’s nationally acclaimed Mexican-American Studies Program.

There will be a question and answer session with the producer and a TUSD Mexican-American Studies Program teacher and former student.

Napa Valley Ethnic Studies Advocates (NVESA) was formed by students, parents and educators in early 2012 to discuss the impact of Ethnics Studies on student academic success, regardless of student’s ethnicity or national origin.

via Napa Valley ethnic studies group to show film on Arizona school struggle – Vallejo Times Herald.

[Podcast] Ethnic Studies, Academic Freedom, and the Value of Scholarship – Download free content from University of Arizona on iTunes

Click http://itunes.apple.com/itunes-u/ethnic-studies-academic-freedom/id520182514 to listen

by Dept. of Gender & Women’s Studies; Faculty Senate Task Force on Equity and Fairness; Programs for Inclusive Excellence-Office of the President

At this Forum on “Ethnic Studies, Academic Freedom and the Value of Scholarship” distinguished UA faculty offer presentations about ethnic studies research, scholarship, and pedagogies, as well as the concepts of intellectual and academic freedom. In keeping with the University of Arizona’s responsibilities as a land-grant university, this event provides an opportunity for the university to take a public role in educating our community about contemporary issues. Further, this forum reaffirms the commitment of the UA to academic freedom and the excellent scholarship and teaching in Ethnic Studies that we feature here. This forum was initiated and organized by the UA Faculty Senate Task Force on Equity and Fairness in collaboration with Raji Rhys, Assistant Vice President for Inclusive Excellence, and members of the Diversity Coalition Communications Group. Primary sponsors included: Programs for Inclusive Excellence-Office of the President, College of Education, College of Humanities, College of Social and Behavioral Sciences, Gender & Women’s Studies, Graduate and Interdisciplinary Programs, The Graduate College, Office of Outreach and Multicultural Affairs-College of Medicine, Philosophy Department, University Libraries. Substantial in-kind support was also provided by ASUA Initiatives for Maximizing Student Diversity.

 

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Neither Banned Nor Allowed: Mexican American Studies in Limbo in Arizona | Fox News Latino

  • sneakingBOOKS.jpg
    Arnie Bermudez

TUCSON –  Public high school instructors who want to teach Latino literature here have few other options besides “The House on Mango Street” by Sandra Cisneros.

Other books may not be banned, but they aren’t allowed either.

via Neither Banned Nor Allowed: Mexican American Studies in Limbo in Arizona | Fox News Latino.

School Board fires head of Mexican-American Studies

The Tucson Unified School Board, in a 3-2 vote, ousted the director of the Mexican-American Studies Program on April 10.

Program Director Sean Arce co-founded the MAS Program in 1999 and developed it into one of the most successful programs in the district. In 2004, the Mexican-American Studies Department was combined with the Pan-Asian, African-American and Native-American Studies Departments to create the new Ethnic Studies Department. This made the Tucson district the only K-12 public school

via School Board fires head of Mexican-American Studies.

Ethnic studies are important for all, white kids included – Opinion – The Scribe – University of Colorado

While riding the shuttle recently, I overheard a fellow student remark, “Ethnic studies is like teaching alternative history.” If the timing had been right, I would have asked my fellow Anglo-American to attend the screening of “Precious Knowledge” that occurred on campus on April10.

The title of the film “Precious Knowledge” comes from a poem by Luis Valdez, “En lak’Ech.” The poem, which opens every class when recited by students in the La Raza/Mexican-Studies programs at Tucson High School, is simple: To love and respect others is to love and respect oneself.

via Ethnic studies are important for all, white kids included – Opinion – The Scribe – University of Colorado.

Tucsons UNIDOS Needs Your Support!

CALLOUT FOR SUPPORT FOR UNIDOS COMMUNITY CENTER!

As a youth-led coalition of critical thinkers and organizers, our purpose is to stand in defense of ethnic studies and address the educational inequities we face in school. While defending ethnic studies has been a critical priority, we stand as a direct force to mobilize, empower and educate youth to take a stand against all injustices in our community and society as a whole.

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